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Thai authorities warn of more buried WWII bombs

Publication Date : 04-04-2014

 

Live World War II aerial bombs have been excavated now and then at various construction sites, prompting authorities to warn against any attempts to tinker with strange metal objects.

For example, one was found during construction of the subway's Red Line on March 27 and the Air Force was called in to handle it.

Yesterday, another one was spotted in Chachoengsao's Plaeng Yao district. Pol Colonel Kamthorn Uicharoen of Forensic Science Police said military experts were on hand to handle the explosive there.

On Wednesday, construction workers found an old bomb in Bang Khen district and sent what they thought was an iron object to a scrapyard to sell for some cash.

When workers tried to cut the object open, a big blast rocked the whole place, causing several deaths and damaging several properties.

"Aerial bombs are about 30 centimetres wide and one metre long. They have an oval shape," an expert said yesterday.

Anyone coming across a suspicious item matching that description should call +66-02-534-3535.

The death toll from the scrapyard explosion rose to eight yesterday, while the search for missing workers was continuing.

The eighth death was confirmed only after officials found the parts of a three-year-old girl who was on the list of people who could not be accounted for.

One of the wounded, Marisa Utsah, 42, feared the worst for her husband.

"He was working at the scrapyard when the explosion happened. Now, no one can find him," she said.

The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration is providing compensation and medical treatment for the victims.

Police estimate the number of wounded at 16-20 and smashed houses at more than 30.

Deputy national police chief General Aek Angsananont said this case would serve as a lesson.

"Some more aerial bombs may still be buried underground now. So, if anyone digs down and finds something suspicious, please alert officials immediately," he said.

 

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